Is This a Duck?

I don’t know! It depends!

unnamedSome years ago I suffered at the hand of an aggressive (abusive!) insurance salesperson. Part of his creative pitch was that he really wasn’t selling insurance. He ultimately became so obnoxious I called the state licensing department (this was not in Maine), described the situation and wondered if this individual might be violating the state licensing requirement. I was prepared for bureaucracy and a run-around so I’ll never forget the investigator’s response. “Well, if it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it’s probably a duck.”

The recent controversy regarding Zillow’s “instant offer” program reminded me of that experience. Among the issues being raised is “Does this instant offer program constitute brokerage and is it, therefore a licensable activity?” Of course, the debate doesn’t stop there. As more organizations and individuals have joined the fray, the questions now range from “Is this good for consumer?” to speculation that Zillow is trying to “disintermediate” (I had to look it up too) brokers and agents. Personally, I’m reminded of a high school debating class and learning that an often-used technique is “begging the issue.” Whether or not the “Instant Offer” program is good for the consumer doesn’t really determine whether or not it’s brokerage. What determines whether or not it’s brokerage requires looking at the law–not whether or not people (brokers, agents, or consumers) like it.

Somewhere between “if it looks like a duck” and an in-depth analysis of statutes and case law, we might find the answer. However, as I often say in class, “Sorry, I left my judge’s robe home so I’m not qualified to offer a ruling.” I do have a personal opinion. But here’s the thing: that personal opinion is based on the Maine Statute that defines brokerage. (Title 32, Chapter 114, §13001 2.)

But here’s the really interesting thing–in case you haven’t noticed. My opinion is based on a MAINE statute. Would it be the same if I were in any other state? As is often the case, there just might be more than one answer to this question–one reason I teach that there are always two correct answers to any question:

  1. “I don’t know.”
  2. “It depends.”

If you ask me whether or not Zillow’s program is brokerage I’ll give you both answers. “I don’t know. It depends.” I don’t know because I’m not that familiar with the program and it depends because the answer might be different depending on where I am when I answer the question.

And that leads us to something to think about.

While we can still say with some accuracy, “all real estate is local” another reality is that the business of real estate is becoming increasingly global. Anyone licensed in two different states will likely honestly admit it becomes important to remember the differences in laws and rules between those two states. Yes, there are many commonalities–but those differences can be significant. “The devil is in the details.”

It would be a keen grasp of the obvious to observe that the world is changing. Twenty years ago the technology didn’t exist for a nation-wide company to offer an “Instant Offer” program. A localized version might have been feasible, but the concern would have been (for example) “Can I legally do this in Maine?” It’s not that simple anymore.

Without creating a political discussion, I think issues like the Zillow question can make us wonder if we will come to see more federal regulation that will facilitate one answer to questions. We can, of course, debate whether or not this would be a good thing… and wonder what the motivation might be for increased federal oversight of real estate brokerage, but that somewhat begs the questions of “Where are we headed?” and “Are we sure we want to go there?”

Oh, by the way. Within 24 hours of talking to the investigator at the insurance division, I stopped hearing from the duck who was “not selling insurance.” His statement actually became true. He was not selling insurance. In fact, he was barred from selling anything resembling it in that state.  Sometimes things are pretty simple and a duck is just a duck.

A recent article posted at RIS Media raises even more questions and reports some opinions on this question.

Article written by Walter Boomsma, a real estate educator in Bangor, ME. 
Check out his blog at boomsmaonline.com for more topics and discussions!

 

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Posted in Instructor Topics, Walter Boomsma. Comments Off on Is This a Duck?
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