‘Massive’ Shortage in Appraisers Causing Home Sales Delays

CNBC reports on the nation-wide shortage of appraisers and some reasons behind it in this interesting article.

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SLRadcliffe | Getty Images

 

http://www.cnbc.com/2016/09/27/massive-shortage-in-appraisers-causing-home-sales-delays.html

 

For those thinking about a career in the appraisal business, the Arthur Gary School of Real Estate offers live and online courses to cover the education you need to start as a trainee.

Please call the office at 207-856-1712 for more information.

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“New” Core Courses — but let’s not call ’em that

Written by Walter Boomsma, instructor. See his blog.

When my oldest daughter was a toddler we were at the beach. In a parental desire to show her things and develop her understanding and vocabulary, I pointed out sea gulls. (She liked animals and birds–still does.) In short order, she began pointing and saying, “Daddy! Birds!” Somewhat absent-mindedly I would reply, “Those are seagulls, Bethanie.”

After several of those exchanges, she said pointedly, “Daddy, you can call them seagulls. I’m going to call them birds.” I have always admired her independence. On this occasion, I opted to accept her refusal to adopt my vocabulary.

But names can be important. So after announcing that “new core courses” are being released, we will not be referring to them as “new” and “old.” We need some fairly precise language here, so I will refer to them by their proper names. Effective October 1, 2016, there be a Core Course for Designated Brokers 2 and a Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers 2. These courses effectively replace the Core Course for Designated Brokers 1 and the Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers 1. When I say “replace,” understand that the courses numbered 2 are different than the courses numbered 1–both in content and application.

So what should you take (or have taken) before you renew your license?

What hasn’t changed:

Designated Brokers must take the “Core Course for Designated Brokers.” Brokers and Associate Brokers must take the Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers. That’s actually pretty straight-forward.

Where it potentially gets confusing:

Whenever there’s a change in core courses, the question always raised is “which core course do I need to have completed when I renew my license?” The answer is, “It depends!” While figuring out the answer initially sounds a bit daunting, this too is fairly straight forward. It depends on the expiration of the license you are renewing. It might help if you have that information before reading further.

Brokers and Associate Brokers with a license expiration date prior to April 1, 2017 (and who renew before that date) may fulfill the core course requirement with either the Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers 1 OR the Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers 2.

Designated Brokers with a license expiration date prior to April 1, 2017 (and who renew before that date) may fulfill the core course requirement with either the Core Course for Designated Brokers 1 OR the Core Course for Designated Brokers 2.

Brokers and Associate Brokers with a license expiration date on or after April 1, 2017 (and who renew after that date) must fulfill the core course requirement with the Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers 2.

Designated Brokers with a license expiration date prior to April 1, 2017 (and who renew before after date) must fulfill the core course requirement with  the Core Course for Designated Brokers 2.

The same explanation would apply to activating a currently inactive license. If you activate before April 1, 2016, either course is acceptable. On or after April 1, 2017, you must have the appropriate Course 2.

If you are at all confused, don’t guess! If you call or email me, the first question I’m going to ask you is “When does your license expire and when to you plan to renew it?” That one bit of information will allow us to determine the correct answer 99% of the time. You can, of course, also ask your DB or call the Maine Real Estate Commission if you need some help determining the answer.

As a reminder, continuing education is only required to renew a license. Sales Agents, for example, are not required to have continuing education hours–a Sales Agent License is not renewable. A Sales Agent’s “continuing education” is the Associate Broker Course. Associate Brokers who plan to take the required course and apply for a Broker License would also not need “continuing education.” Personally, I still think continuing education is a great idea in both of those scenarios even though it’s not required. I remember one sales agent who came to the Associate Broker Course with a lot of “under contracts” during a very depressed market. His classmates were in awe and wonder. He explained, “I’ve taken over 40 hours of continuing education. There might be a correlation!”

I will be teaching both the Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers 2 and the Core Course for Designated Brokers 2 on Friday, October 7, 2016 at the Ramada Inn in Bangor. For more information and to register, you can call the Arthur Gary School of Real Estate at 856-1712 or visit the Arthur Gary School of Real Estate Website.

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Study To Understand!

Written by Walter Boomsma, instructor. See his blog.

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As we begin another season of licensing courses, it’s a good time to consider our study habits.

“If you study to remember, you will forget. If you study to understand, you will remember!”

Truer words were never spoken—at least for most! This course is intense and for most students will include new concepts, new vocabulary, and require some basic math skills. While there will be some things that require memorization, much of the course is about applied learning and understanding how you will be using information once licensed. Most people underestimate the difficulty level and commitment it will take to succeed, but most people also end up getting through the course and passing. Failure is certainly possible, but it is the exception.

If you’ve been out of school for a while, you’ll want to develop a plan for studying. Most students will affirm, you can’t simply sit in class and expect to pass the course. Some successful techniques students have used:

 

  • Create a daily study plan or routine, regardless of the time between classes. Even if it’s only 15-30 minutes, review at least some portion of your notes every day. Remember that studying isn’t just about going over material. Think about how you will best learn and remember. People “chunk” information differently. Consider how you’ve learned things in the past and plan your learning. I remember one student who created a second notebook and quite literally re-wrote (in long hand) her entire notes after every class. I wouldn’t learn that way, but she surely did!

 

  • Hone your note-taking skills. Remember they are your notes and they should reflect how you best learn and remember. Attempting to take down everything the instructor says verbatim may not be most effective. I’ve seen students draw pictures and diagrams or concept maps. One memorable student needed extra space for her multicolored highlighters and stick on flags. While I never fully understood her system, it did seem to work for her.

 

  • Flash cards can be a great study aid—particularly with vocabulary. As part of your study plan, use index cards to record a word on one side and the definition on the other. You can create them from your notes. You’ll have quite a pile by the end of the course, but you want to flip through them, testing yourself. When you find yourself getting the answer right consistently remove the card from the deck so you are working on the concepts and definitions necessary. (You should probably review all your cards before the final exam!)

 

  • Consider finding a “study buddy.” While a classmate can be ideal, it can be someone who actually doesn’t understand the material. One student gave her young daughter her flashcards and had her ask questions during a long trip they made together while Mom was taking the class.

 

  • Where you study can be important. It might go without saying, you’ll want a place that allows you to concentrate. You should have everything you need and nothing you do not need. Turn off the smart phone. In general, avoid distractions and create a block of “quality” study time. Although I remember one student who was struggling until she decided to spread her flashcards on her kitchen island. Every time she passed the island she’d pick up a random card. You have to discover what works for you and remember that how you study may be more important than what and for how long.

 

  • Avoid studying to the quiz (or test). As the quotation at the beginning of this article suggests, study to learn and understand. When you focus on a quiz or test it can create additional anxiety. Shift your thinking from “I’ve got to pass” to “I want to learn.” Relax! Give yourself breaks and rewards and try to stay positive. If you find yourself getting anxious and confused, take a short break.

 

  • Teach the material you’re trying to learn. It’s generally accepted that a very effective learning technique is to teach the material. You can do this with your study buddy from class or even someone who knows nothing about the topic. He or she may not know if you are correct, but if you can get them to understand it, you probably understand it as well!

 

  • Talk to your instructor if you are having difficulty in general or with a specific aspect of the course. He/she understands there are different learning styles and sometimes a “one on one” conversation can create an “Aha! Now I get it!” that may not be possible in a group setting.

Picasso said, “I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it.” Focus on the doing. Challenge yourself! There may be times when you feel you aren’t getting something, but just keep doing. Don’t think, for example, “I can’t do cap rates!” Do them. You will learn how.

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Delayed Start for Broker Course

Written by Walter Boomsma, instructor. See his blog.MH900439339

The Broker class scheduled to start on September 11 has been delayed and will now begin on October 9th… It’s a Wednesday class that will qualify you for a broker’s license. In other words, you do not have to  want to be a designated broker to benefit from this course! In addition to going into far greater detail on familiar topics; this course adds some topics not covered in other qualifying education courses such as sales agent and associate broker.

One very important one is “negotiation” — you’ll see the value and benefits of using principled negotiation over positional bargaining. And the topic of “ethics” will certainly make you think. You’ll also benefit from exploring some basic training techniques and consider the role of policy in building your business as an individual as well as a company.

But wait, there’s more! How about “risk management” strategies? Are they ways to minimize your exposure to complaints and law suits?

If you’ve held a broker’s license for a while, you might also consider re-taking the course as a refresher and to see how much things have changed since you were licensed. As a reward for doing so, you’ll receive 18 hours of continuing education credit! (You’ll still need to take the current core course to meet the full CE requirements.)

You can register for the course by calling  207 856-1712 or visiting the Arthur Gary School of Real Estate website.