“New” Core Courses — but let’s not call ’em that

Written by Walter Boomsma, instructor. See his blog.

When my oldest daughter was a toddler we were at the beach. In a parental desire to show her things and develop her understanding and vocabulary, I pointed out sea gulls. (She liked animals and birds–still does.) In short order, she began pointing and saying, “Daddy! Birds!” Somewhat absent-mindedly I would reply, “Those are seagulls, Bethanie.”

After several of those exchanges, she said pointedly, “Daddy, you can call them seagulls. I’m going to call them birds.” I have always admired her independence. On this occasion, I opted to accept her refusal to adopt my vocabulary.

But names can be important. So after announcing that “new core courses” are being released, we will not be referring to them as “new” and “old.” We need some fairly precise language here, so I will refer to them by their proper names. Effective October 1, 2016, there be a Core Course for Designated Brokers 2 and a Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers 2. These courses effectively replace the Core Course for Designated Brokers 1 and the Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers 1. When I say “replace,” understand that the courses numbered 2 are different than the courses numbered 1–both in content and application.

So what should you take (or have taken) before you renew your license?

What hasn’t changed:

Designated Brokers must take the “Core Course for Designated Brokers.” Brokers and Associate Brokers must take the Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers. That’s actually pretty straight-forward.

Where it potentially gets confusing:

Whenever there’s a change in core courses, the question always raised is “which core course do I need to have completed when I renew my license?” The answer is, “It depends!” While figuring out the answer initially sounds a bit daunting, this too is fairly straight forward. It depends on the expiration of the license you are renewing. It might help if you have that information before reading further.

Brokers and Associate Brokers with a license expiration date prior to April 1, 2017 (and who renew before that date) may fulfill the core course requirement with either the Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers 1 OR the Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers 2.

Designated Brokers with a license expiration date prior to April 1, 2017 (and who renew before that date) may fulfill the core course requirement with either the Core Course for Designated Brokers 1 OR the Core Course for Designated Brokers 2.

Brokers and Associate Brokers with a license expiration date on or after April 1, 2017 (and who renew after that date) must fulfill the core course requirement with the Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers 2.

Designated Brokers with a license expiration date prior to April 1, 2017 (and who renew before after date) must fulfill the core course requirement with  the Core Course for Designated Brokers 2.

The same explanation would apply to activating a currently inactive license. If you activate before April 1, 2016, either course is acceptable. On or after April 1, 2017, you must have the appropriate Course 2.

If you are at all confused, don’t guess! If you call or email me, the first question I’m going to ask you is “When does your license expire and when to you plan to renew it?” That one bit of information will allow us to determine the correct answer 99% of the time. You can, of course, also ask your DB or call the Maine Real Estate Commission if you need some help determining the answer.

As a reminder, continuing education is only required to renew a license. Sales Agents, for example, are not required to have continuing education hours–a Sales Agent License is not renewable. A Sales Agent’s “continuing education” is the Associate Broker Course. Associate Brokers who plan to take the required course and apply for a Broker License would also not need “continuing education.” Personally, I still think continuing education is a great idea in both of those scenarios even though it’s not required. I remember one sales agent who came to the Associate Broker Course with a lot of “under contracts” during a very depressed market. His classmates were in awe and wonder. He explained, “I’ve taken over 40 hours of continuing education. There might be a correlation!”

I will be teaching both the Core Course for Brokers and Associate Brokers 2 and the Core Course for Designated Brokers 2 on Friday, October 7, 2016 at the Ramada Inn in Bangor. For more information and to register, you can call the Arthur Gary School of Real Estate at 856-1712 or visit the Arthur Gary School of Real Estate Website.

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EPA Inspections Ongoing in Maine!

EPA Begins Effort to Reduce Children’s Exposure to Lead Paint in Lewiston/Auburn, Maine Area

BOSTON – EPA is beginning an effort to improve compliance with laws that protect children from lead paint poisoning by sending certified letters this month to about 400 home renovation and painting contractors, property management companies and landlords in and around Lewiston/Auburn, Maine.

epalawUnder the initiative, EPA will provide educational materials on lead paint rules to affected companies. EPA will also outline steps the Agency is taking to increase compliance on the part of these entities with the federal lead-based paint Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) Rule under the Toxic Substances Control Act. EPA’s RRP Rule became effective in April 2010.

“Children’s exposure to lead continues to be a significant health concern here in New England,” said Curt Spalding, regional administrator of EPA’s New England office. “This is especially true for kids who live in underprivileged areas and other places where there is a large amount of older housing stock that hasn’t been renovated and lead paint has not been removed. Our initiative in Lewiston/Auburn is designed such that EPA will work closely with our local, state and federal partners to address a serious public health problem affecting children.”

EPA continues to prioritize resources at both the national and regional level to educate companies and inform the public about federal lead paint rules. EPA’s RRP Rule is designed to prevent children’s exposure to lead-based paint and/or lead-based paint hazards resulting from renovation, repair and painting projects in pre-1978 residences, schools and other buildings where children are present. If lead painted surfaces are to be disturbed at a job site, the Rule requires individual renovators to complete an initial 8-hour accredited training course and the company or firm that they work for to be certified by EPA. These baseline requirements are critical to ensuring that companies take responsibility for their employees following proper lead safe work practices by containing and managing lead dust and chips created during such projects. Further, the Rule requires that specific records be created and maintained in order to document compliance with the law.

Infants and children are especially vulnerable to lead paint exposure, which can cause lifelong impacts including developmental impairment, learning disabilities, impaired hearing, reduced attention span, hyperactivity and behavioral problems. Because New England has a lot of older housing stock, lead paint is still frequently present in buildings that were built before 1978, when lead paint was banned. According to the most recent data available from the Maine Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, Lewiston/Auburn has the highest number of incidences in the state of children under the age of six with elevated blood lead levels.

morefinesFollowing outreach efforts in May, over the course of several weeks in June, EPA will conduct inspections of renovation, painting and property management companies in the area to assess compliance with the RRP Rule. EPA may also assess compliance with the Real Estate Notification and Disclosure Rule, which requires landlords, property management companies, real estate agencies, and sellers to inform potential lessees and purchasers of the presence of lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards in pre-1978 housing. This rule ensures that potential tenants and home buyers are receiving the information necessary to protect themselves and their families from lead-based paint hazards prior to being obligated to rent or purchase pre-1978 housing. The inspections may be followed up with enforcement which may include the issuance of fines.

Enforcing lead paint notification and worksite standards helps to level the playing field for companies complying with the law, as well as helps to provide a safer and healthier environment for children. EPA is coordinating with many state and local agencies, including several municipal departments in both cities, the Maine Department of Health and Human Services, the Maine Department of Environmental Protection, and several non-governmental organizations such as Healthy Androscoggin.

EPA engaged in similar efforts in the New Haven, Conn. area in 2014 and in the Nashua, N.H. area in 2015. As a result of these efforts, EPA has educated thousands of individuals either engaged in this type of work or impacted by it, settled numerous formal and informal enforcement actions, and levied fines against the most serious violators. Importantly, because of the compliance assistance provided, many renovation firms have stepped forward to become newly certified and have sent their workers to be trained.

For more information:

Although lead paint has been identified as the primary source of childhood lead poisoning, drinking water, soil, air, and consumer products are other potential sources of lead. Please visit this EPA website to help protect your family from exposures to lead: https://www.epa.gov/lead/protect-your-family-exposures-lead

Need to renew your RRP certification?

The EPA is focused in Maine right now! Check out our website for a schedule of upcoming classes!

Click Here for a list of our upcoming training dates!

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When Should I Take the Associate Broker Course? –the answer might surprise you!

Written by Walter Boomsma, instructor. See his blog.

take_a_walk_150_clr_8169At first, this seems like an easy question. But there are a number of factors contributing to the answer. Let’s review some basic facts.

A sales agent license is non-renewable and is valid for two years. In other words, you must be prepared to apply for and receive your associate broker license upon expiration of your sales agent license. (There are some circumstances which allow for a one year exemption, but they are exceptions. You should plan on becoming licensed as as associate broker at the end of your two year license term.)

An associate broker license includes two important qualifications. First, you must have been licensed as a real estate sales agent for two of the past five years. Second, you must complete the Associate Broker Course. (MRS Title 32, Chapter 114, Section 13199) In other words, you must successfully complete the Associate Broker Course before your sales agent license expires. But you still can’t become an associate broker until you’ve completed two years as a sales agent.

So an “easy” answer is “You should take the Associate Broker Course while you are licensed as a sales agent.” It would also be an accurate answer, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. A good follow up question is “Should I take the Associate Broker Course soon after I get licensed as a sales agent, or wait a while?”

The answer to that question depends on several important factors:

  1. How much practical experience are you gaining as a sales agent? The Associate Broker Course is designed to be more about experience and application than the Sales Agent Course. In fact, the Associate Broker Course is based largely on case studies and scenarios. Until you’ve been involved in an actual transaction, the course simply won’t have full value. In addition, completion of the Associate Broker Course includes a requirement you submit a completed Documented Field Experience Form. This form is completed in partnership with your designated broker or mentor and is designed to insure you’ve had some “hands on” experience.
  2. How available is the Associate Broker Course in your area?  The course is 60 hours long and is not something you can complete at the last minute in a few days. In the Bangor area I tend to teach it twice a year–spring and fall for the Arthur Gary School of Real Estate. That means there are three opportunities to chose from during your two year term as a sales agent. Note, however, that we alternate between weekday and weekend courses. If your schedule limits when (day of the week) you can take the course, that limits your choices.
  3. How certain are you that you are going to remain licensed? There are many different reasons that someone might decide not to pursue a career in real estate. Since taking the Associate Broker Course is an investment, it might make sense to wait until your second year as a sales agent.

There simply is no one answer to the question–you have to consider the factors. I have had students get licensed as a sales agent and come back to take the Associate Broker Course within a few months. Their explanation is “I want as much education as I can get as quickly as I can get it.” How can you argue with that?! (Again, understanding you’ll gain the best education if you’ve had at least some hands on experience.) I’ve also had students procrastinate taking the course for various reasons. Unfortunately that sometimes means I get a frantic email or phone call when they realize they are facing expiration of their licenses next month. It really is easier to plan ahead.

Let’s take a hypothetical student named Suzie who gets licensed on March 15, 2015. Her license is set to expire on March 15, 2017.  Using the “Spring/Fall” schedule I teach, that means Suzie can plan to take the Associate Broker Course in in fall 2015 at the earliest. She’ll have a spring and fall opportunity in 2016. She might have an opportunity to take the course in spring 2017 but will need to have completed it by March 15th.

Remember that the Bangor course I teach with the Arthur Gary School of Real Estate alternates as a weekday or weekend course. The spring course is typically a weekday course and the fall course is a weekend course. If Suzie is working full time and can only take the course on the weekends, she’ll need to take it either in the fall of 2015 or the fall of 2016. There are, of course, other courses available from other providers and instructors. I just happen to like having students return! I wish I’d kept track, because I know there are a number of students who have completed all of their licensing courses with me from sales agent through broker.

If you find this confusing or are uncertain what will work best for you, don’t hesitate to give me a call or email. We can talk through your options and figure out what works best!

–Walter Boomsma

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REEA Spotlight Member

The December 26, 2013 Spotlight Member of the Real Estate Educator’s Association (REEA) website is Arthur R. Gary! See their front page announcement here, where Arthur’s photo and profile will be featured for the day.

Beware Of Zombie Property Titles

Article from Your Realty Insider.

 

HHouseWith the economic downturn, anyone dealing in real estate quickly became familiar with previously little-known terms such as foreclosure and short sale. Now that the housing market is picking back up and people are moving on, a new term is coming to light – zombie titles.

The Zombie Title
This is when a home has been vacated because the owners defaulted on their loan and their bank started the foreclosure process. However, for some reason or another the bank never completed the foreclosure and sold the home. So, when the city starts fining someone for the overgrown grass and dilapidated structure, the homeowner who thought they were finished with the property gets the bill.

A Home That Keeps Haunting
Homeowners think they don’t own the property any longer and therefore try to move on by rebuilding their credit score and finding a new place to live. It can be a rude awakening to find out that not only do they still own a home they could have been living in, but also its long vacancy has caused it to fall into disrepair.

It’s Spooking The Neighborhood
These vacant homes can decrease the value of a neighborhood. If the bank or the unsuspecting homeowner are neither one taking care of the property, then it can become overgrown and an eyesore on the block. It becomes a problem with no solution because the owner won’t want to invest any money in fixing up the property when the bank could come back with the foreclosure at any time.

Nail Shut The Foreclosure Coffin
Homeowners who have foreclosed on a home should double check that their bank actually followed through to closing on a sale. They could contact their lender or check public property records just to make sure. Otherwise, they could be haunted by their housing nightmare all over again. Don’t let the zombie title of a past property haunt your future! Check with your bank to make sure you’re free and clear of your foreclosure. If you’d like more information on zombie titles or have other questions about local real estate, please contact your trusted real estate professional.

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The Value of a Photograph

Image courtesy of idea go/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of idea go/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Do you know the value of a photograph when it comes to listing a home? A little time spent presenting, by way of good real-estate listing photos, will pay off in the end.

A recent Wall Street Journal article stressed the importance of taking many photographs of a house, and making sure that they are quality photos, when listing a property. In the online world we live in, buyers are eager to see as much of a home as can be shown online. More time is spent researching potential homes online, so if you don’t grab them with good photos, they may not even look at the property. One researchers suggest, “If I was selling, I would put every picture I could on the listing, at a ratio of four to five interior vs. one exterior.”

According to the article, adding at least one photo to a residential-real-estate listing increases the final sale price by up to 3.9%.

You can view this amazing slide show of listings, which shows different ways to photograph the same home. Manhattan-based photographer Michael Weinstein advises agents to look for the single “wow photo” to open the listing.Try to see the room from the buyers eyes down to the tiniest details. The details make all the difference in real-estate listing photos. If photography is not your skill, hire a professional to do the job for you. A few extra dollars spent to get that 3% increase on a home is a good trade.

The article breaks down the importance of photographs like this:

Image Control

How photos with property listings affect the sale price and time on market:

  • 3.5% Increase in sale price when an online listing contains one or more photos.
  • 3.9% Increase in sale price when a listing with only one photo shows an interior view.
  • 1.9% Increase in sale price when a listing with only one photo shows an exterior view.
  • 20.6% Rise in the time it takes to sell the property when a listing contains at least one photo.
  • $150 to $200 Estimated increase to the sale price per additional photo.

Source: ‘On the Relationship Between Property Price, Time-on-Market, and Photo Depictions in a Multiple Listing Service,’ 2011, co-authored by Ken H. Johnson, an associate professor of finance at Florida International University’s Hollo School of Real Estate

So be sure to take photographs of your listings, or hire a professional to do it for you. Leave us a message on Facebook if you have had any experience where photographs either helped or hindered your sale.

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